Report about European Food Chains

The report SUPPLY CHA!NGE in European food chains provides a comprehensive overview of the Business Forum, which took place in Milan in October 2015, as part of the SUPPLY CHA!NGE project. But more than just reporting about the event, the report analyses and explores the challenges relating to the complex, heterogeneous, and globalized nature of European food supply chains and their implications in the context of supermarket store brands.

Bonn, 05.10.2016

SUPPLY CHA!NGE in European Food Chains Business Forum Report


The report SUPPLY CHA!NGE in European food chains provides a comprehensive overview of the Business Forum, which took place in Milan in October 2015, as part of the SUPPLY CHA!NGE project. But more than just reporting about the event, the report analyses and explores the challenges relating to the complex, heterogeneous, and globalized nature of European food supply chains and their implications in the context of supermarket store brands. Asserting the need to implement a holistic and multi-stakeholder approach, the report also identifies opportunities and provides recommendations for the process of making these supply chains more sustainable and fair. The report is addressed to all actors involved throughout food supply chains including farmers, suppliers, consumers, policy and decision makers, with a strong focus on retailers as the catalysts and driving agents towards improving the sustainability performance of European food supply chains.

ACTION STEPS TO IMPLEMENT A FAIR AND SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY CHAIN

The reports lists top 10 recommendations focused on retailers as the key driving agent and coordinator of stakeholders to enable improved food chains:  

  1. Analyse sourcing performance, map supply chain and include all entities involved.  
  2. Identify ecological and social hotspots and critical intervention points and work closely with partners to remedy them.  
  3. Communicate with and request suppliers and their sub-tiers to include sustainability considerations in their production patterns.  
  4. For long-term enhanced productivity, invest in the capacity building of partners (farmers and suppliers).
  5. Adopt and implement established codes of conduct, guidelines and standards, beyond compliance.  
  6. Set measurable goals and identify measurable metrics.  
  7. Implement supply chain auditing and monitoring mechanisms beyond the first tier.  
  8. Communicate company value, sustainability performance and increase transparency by establishing reporting practices regarding financial and non-financial data.  
  9. Engage consumers by highlighting key issues and providing point-of-sale navigation on responsible choice to become their trusted supplier.  
  10. Forge and join collaboration and partnership initiatives to be a recognized sustainability leader.

Full report on http://bit.ly/2cT6Hyv
Source: http://bit.ly/2dSf13o




Tags: Retail Industry | Food Industry | Consumer


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