New toolkit for reducing food waste

The toolkit of the the Food Waste Reduction Alliance focuses on strategies food manufacturers, retailers and foodservice operators can employ to keep food out of landfills, and to reduce food waste at the source.


© flickr | jbloom | plate scraping
Washington, DC 16. April 2014

Approximately 80 billion pounds of food waste are discarded in U.S. landfills each year. The majority is generated at the residential level, but it can also be a byproduct of manufacturing, retail and foodservice operations.

"The Food Waste Reduction Alliance has been working to tackle food waste challenges within the food sector since 2011, but we know that there are companies out there that are just starting to look at the issue,” said Gail Tavill, vice president, sustainable development for ConAgra Foods and one of the toolkit authors. The toolkit aims to elevate the issue of food waste within the sector and enables more companies to take action by sharing key learnings and model practices gleaned from organizations who are at the leading edge of this issue.

The model practices and emerging solutions were compiled from the more than 30 FWRA member companies that are focused on reducing food waste within their operations. Specific topics discussed include:

The toolkit also offers a "Getting Started” section for companies that are just beginning to consider food waste reduction strategies. Conducting a waste characterization assessment, establishing standard operating procedures and developing collaborative relationships with partners from the anti-hunger community, waste management providers and other stakeholders are among the starting points outlined.

Numerous real-life examples and case studies of the approaches discussed are found throughout the Best Practices and Emerging Solutions Toolkit. The toolkit includes examples and insights from companies that illustrate the strategies outlined. What’s more, the alliance recognizes that there are operational differences between food manufacturers, retailers and foodservice companies, so there are case studies that speak to the unique concerns and challenges of each sector. 

The toolkit was produced by the Food Waste Reduction Alliance (FWRA), a cross-sector industry initiative led by the Food Marketing Institute (FMI), the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) and the National Restaurant Association (NRA).

Further information


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